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Thread: The Mystery of Supercar Allocations

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    Default The Mystery of Supercar Allocations

    Just posted up a new article on the The Mystery of Supercar Allocations:

    https://karenable.com/the-mystery-of...r-allocations/

    Probably will not getting a Christmas card from Ferrari this year.....

    Comments?

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    Interesting.

    One question I have in this area that you may have a view on is whether the increase, almost explosion in fact, of limited edition models is a good or bad thing for the Supercar market? There was a time when limited edition seemed to be something brands like Ferrari did once every 10 years, now it seems a ‘limited edition’ model launch happens every few months. Is this a good thing as it opens up the experience to more people and an expanding market keeps demand high? Or a bad thing as it dilutes the whole idea of a limited edition?

    Just curious in your view.

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    To me it just seems to be a way for the "loyal bottomless pocket customers" to make a bob or two flipping them for the less fortunate who are not on the list.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nosevi View Post
    Interesting.

    One question I have in this area that you may have a view on is whether the increase, almost explosion in fact, of limited edition models is a good or bad thing for the Supercar market? There was a time when limited edition seemed to be something brands like Ferrari did once every 10 years, now it seems a ‘limited edition’ model launch happens every few months. Is this a good thing as it opens up the experience to more people and an expanding market keeps demand high? Or a bad thing as it dilutes the whole idea of a limited edition?

    Just curious in your view.
    Well for a long time I was consistently arguing that the overall growth in the worldwide car market was the dominant force at work and that the inexorable rise in hypercar / supercar market was merely reflecting growing demand however...

    The slowdown in key emerging markets is triggering some adjustments. Again sorry for the vague details - we can’t divulge much - but we have just had three hypercar projects cancelled (don’t worry we received agreed damages) because their elite customer previews didn’t raise enough in deposits. The mood seems to be one of ‘not special enough’ and or not enough technical innovations. Also the upper market tier is moving solidly towards totally bespoke builds. The industry recently carried out a benchmarking exercise in this niche of niche sectors and it makes very interesting reading.

    The allocations game is one of give your ‘patronage’ to the marque and buy lots of things you don’t want which is very expensive OR await and find a flipped car that closely matches your desired spec. The latter actually makes financial sense in a lot of cases.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nosevi View Post
    Interesting.

    One question I have in this area that you may have a view on is whether the increase, almost explosion in fact, of limited edition models is a good or bad thing for the Supercar market? There was a time when limited edition seemed to be something brands like Ferrari did once every 10 years, now it seems a ‘limited edition’ model launch happens every few months. Is this a good thing as it opens up the experience to more people and an expanding market keeps demand high? Or a bad thing as it dilutes the whole idea of a limited edition?

    Just curious in your view.
    I don't think the explosion has been a good thing at all. One truly revolutionary supercar every 7-10 years from each major manufacturer seems to me to be a much better cadence. Launch one every other year and the you dilute the entire experience.

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    Quote Originally Posted by achaddy View Post
    To me it just seems to be a way for the "loyal bottomless pocket customers" to make a bob or two flipping them for the less fortunate who are not on the list.
    That may have been the case a few years ago but values have been tanking lately.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Boxer View Post
    I don't think the explosion has been a good thing at all. One truly revolutionary supercar every 7-10 years from each major manufacturer seems to me to be a much better cadence. Launch one every other year and the you dilute the entire experience.
    I would tend to agree with this.

    Quote Originally Posted by Modificato View Post
    Well for a long time I was consistently arguing that the overall growth in the worldwide car market was the dominant force at work and that the inexorable rise in hypercar / supercar market was merely reflecting growing demand however...

    The slowdown in key emerging markets is triggering some adjustments. Again sorry for the vague details - we can’t divulge much - but we have just had three hypercar projects cancelled (don’t worry we received agreed damages) because their elite customer previews didn’t raise enough in deposits. The mood seems to be one of ‘not special enough’ and or not enough technical innovations. Also the upper market tier is moving solidly towards totally bespoke builds. The industry recently carried out a benchmarking exercise in this niche of niche sectors and it makes very interesting reading.
    Interesting take on it, and from your position I’d expect you to have a good insight on how things are changing so useful input.

    I’ll be honest, I don’t entirely ‘get’ the need for totally bespoke. That’s not a reflection on companies such as the one you are involved with which I’m sure do fantastic work and are filling a gap in the market. But if I wanted (and could afford - that’s a consideration here) a LaFerrari, I’d want a standard LaFerrari. I wouldn’t want one with tartan seats and an extra fin just because no one else’s had that. Seems odd to me that people do. If I had an F40 for example I wouldn’t paint it to make it different, I’d be quite happy with standard red. I’m intrigued how the second hand market of some bespoke cars I’ve seen will go - if it’s one of a kind because no one else spec’ed it like that, it could be it’s one of a kind because no one else actually wanted to.
    Last edited by Nosevi; 01-07-2019 at 05:53 AM.

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    Really interesting article.

    It's a wonder that some of these manufacturers retain any loyalty whatsoever. If I was was looking to spend £800k on a 918 and didn't get my call returned, I'd never buy another Porsche, the same way I've never bought an Alfa after an horrendous experience trying to buy a car back in the late 90's.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffekins View Post
    Really interesting article.

    It's a wonder that some of these manufacturers retain any loyalty whatsoever. If I was was looking to spend £800k on a 918 and didn't get my call returned, I'd never buy another Porsche, the same way I've never bought an Alfa after an horrendous experience trying to buy a car back in the late 90's.
    The reality is the salesperson and the client are obviously living totally different life experiences. I went to a car show yesterday just a small cars and coffee thing. I went in the wife's much modified Abarth Essesse. A great little car and having been littered in assetto corsa parts very interesting. Waved through parked in the back no fuss. Turn up in one of the Ferrari's always given a place in the top car park - for now...

    Turn up in a car from our company it would bring the house down and that goes at ANY car show as our cars regularly appear at pebble beach, villa d'este etc.

    The fact is that at the top of the market many customers are not so much car enthusiasts but experience enthusiasts. Relaying experiences is the number one topic of conversation rather than possessions per se and designing, configuring, and tailoring a car is pretty good material for dinner time chat.

    On the not returning calls / poor service - this is something the high end brands know only too well and most will tell you that it's a big concern. The basic challenge is getting staff that can relate to the client without going all : giddy / resentful / awestruck / combative / jealous / technical / rude on the customer

    Many customers of these customers have quirky personalities so want quirky stuff. We have had customers deliberately spec cars precisely so they are worthless to anyone else. For some that's the whole point.

    Ferrari are seen as the benchmark in the market (at this level) precisely because they have a long history of serving this client base and guiding tastes towards choices that have created iconic cars. We have a mantra at work if you can't understand and relate to the customers choices that not their problem it's yours. If the customer can't relate to your suggestions and suggestions that's not their problem it's yours.

    We have key staff who our customers love and count as friends and others we wouldn't even let in the same room.

    It seems quite a common trait that humans like to project their definition of value onto others - we can all be guilty of this and often subconsciously.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Modificato View Post
    T
    On the not returning calls / poor service - this is something the high end brands know only too well and most will tell you that it's a big concern. The basic challenge is getting staff that can relate to the client without going all : giddy / resentful / awestruck / combative / jealous / technical / rude on the customer
    It is definitely a major challenge, I have sent a couple of emails to Gordon Murray Design and not gotten a single response. At this point my interest in the T.50 is zero.

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